Bold policies for progress north and south

anna portrait  picWorking in silos has long been a problem within the cancer community, as people engaged in increasingly specialised fields struggle to remain aware of the bigger picture. So it can be important, on occasion, to bring the different constituents together around a single agenda.

One might have wondered, however, whether the World Oncology Forum, which gathered almost two months ago in Lugano, Switzerland, might not have been a little over-ambitious in setting an agenda that focused on two topics that are poles apart in almost every respect, including the geographical.

The first of these, fixing the ‘broken model’ of new drug development, is a priority issue for the northern hemisphere. The second, addressing unmet need for the most rudimentary detection, treatment and palliative care, is the priority in the South. The opportunity to explore these challenges and the associated policy implications, within a single gathering, however, turned out to be remarkably constructive.

wof collage Hearing about some of the best examples of low- to middle-income countries that have taken well-planned, system-wide, sensibly financed steps to get the widest possible access to the best possible early detection, treatment and follow-up showed just how much can be achieved for cancer patients, even with modest resources, by simply getting the fundamentals right.

While hearing about the cost, both in health expenditure and overtreatment, of squeezing out additional survival benefit for patients in better resourced health systems brought home how unsustainable current approaches to developing new treatments are becoming, even for world’s wealthiest countries. The message that came out was about priorities.

  • Don’t waste resources on expensive equipment and therapies if the money can be better used getting the fundamentals right for everybody who needs them.
  • Don’t waste resources on developing new therapies unless they aim high – which means tackling resistance rather simply chasing cancer cell evolution from dependence on one mutated pathway to the next.

Bold policy initiatives that champion the public interest will be needed at international and national level to achieve what must be achieved. The task of the 35 assembled experts, leaders and innovators in their own fields, was to spell out the core elements of such initiatives.

As keynote speaker Paul Workman, chief executive of the UK Institute of Cancer Research, points out in the video below, the level of agreement among participants was remarkable, given the differences in their geographic and professional backgrounds and the strong views held by all.

The exact wording of the final policy appeal is currently being finalised. It will be published on this blog and in the March issue of Cancer World, which will carry a full report of this remarkable meeting. It will also feed into a discussion at the ‘Davos’ World Economic Forum on meeting the challenge of the global cancer epidemic, if and when the organisers confirm that the issue has made it onto the final agenda at the end of January 2015.

Slides from most of the presentations are available now on the ESO website (access requires you to register with Club ESO).

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