Smoke gets in your eyes

Simon Crompton

Simon Crompton

The title of Europa Donna’s annual London symposium last week was “New directions in breast cancer”. By the end of the evening, possible new directions were clear, but the route to take was not.

One of the two speakers was Daniel Leff, a cancer surgeon from Imperial College London, who addressed the difficulties of defining the correct margins when surgically removing breast cancer. The object had to be, he said, reducing the chances of reoperation.

He tantalised the audience with the question: “Can surgical smoke be informative?”

Potential of spectrometer analysis

Researchers at Imperial have used mass spectrometers to analyse the smoke arising from tissue incision with electrosurgical knives – a technique known as Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS). Different types of cell produce different chemical concentrations when burned, so the chemical profile can indicate whether the tissue being cut is cancerous or not.

Identification of cancerous tissue using the technique during surgery, said Leff, was 93% accurate.

It’s a truly impressive technological development, that has potential to radically reduce reoperation rates for breast cancer.

The cost question

But how much did the machinery cost, asked a member of the audience? Half a million pounds, answered Leff. And how much did a pathologist cost? The answer was not given, but the point was made…

Pathologists already have advanced (and cheaper) techniques which can accurately indicate to surgeons which areas are cancerous and which are not. The question, said audience members, was why they were not being used. Leff himself acknowledged that pathology analysis using frozen section and touch imprint cytology were highly effective ways of determining the extent of breast disease and reducing the need for re-excision. But they are not widely used in the UK.

Novelty intoxication

On the systemic therapy side, Stephen Johnston, Professor of Breast Cancer Medicine at the Royal Marsden Hospital, spoke of the real promise of the drug Palbociclib as a first-line treatment for ER-positive breast cancer, and (in combination with Fulvestrant) as a second-line treatment as well. The cost of Palbociclib? Around £90,000 for one year’s treatment. The pressing question of how such expensive drugs are to be made widely available was raised, but not addressed.

New directions in breast cancer are exciting, involving, often inspiring. But we know how easy it is to become intoxicated with novelty and infatuated with technology. Sometimes, it isn’t new directions we need to hear about, but what is already here but under-utilised – and how we can best use what is proven, affordable and practicable to benefit the greatest number of women possible, as soon as possible.

Europa Donna, the European Breast Cancer Coalition, has a Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 × two =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>