Tag Archives: Clifton Leaf

War Against Cancer: the audited accounts

 


The truth in samll doses
Efforts to cure cancer are being hobbled by a culture that obliges researchers to think small and cautious while systematically overstating how much is being achieved.

Journalist and lymphoma survivor Clifton Leaf argues this case in his book The Truth in Small Doses: Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer and How to Win It.

His book is the culmination of almost 10 years of research, which generated a number of articles in Fortune, the New York Times and other publications along the way.

It is a call for a change in the cancer research culture, written by someone who knows what it is like to have their life hang in the balance, who believes in medical research, and who has devoted many years to trying to understand why progress is so slow and how we can do better.

In recognition of his achievement in opening up a lively and informed discussion within and beyond the cancer research community,  ESO awarded Leaf the first ever Best Cancer Reporter Lifetime Achievement Award, commending in particular his meticulous research and his ability to make sense of his material and tell the story in a way that is both compelling and constructive.

Resonance
The Truth in Small Doses is a joy to read, with a wealth of anecdotes that on their own justify the cover price. Like the one about the one-eyed surgeon, Denis Burkitt, who – in a goal-oriented collaboration with pathologists, virologists and an entomologist – solved the riddle of the aggressive tumours of the jaw that were killing so many children at his mission hospital in Kampala, with support from a £250 research grant, a 1953 Ford Jubilee station wagon, and a neighbouring hospital director who had a way with cars.

But Leaf also describes a world that cancer researchers are all too familiar with: endless applications for research grants; keen young scientists, full of ideas, obliged to focus on ‘safe’ well-explored topics, with enough a priori evidence to convince grant panels there is a good chance of a positive outcome.

Some points in the book are certainly open to challenge. When it comes to playing it safe, it could be argued that industry is more of a problem than academia. And while there are good reasons to argue, as Leaf does, for more research to be directed at tackling the disease at its earliest or precancerous stages, there are other innovative approaches with an equally strong scientific rationale that suffer the same neglect.

His core message, however, clearly resonates with a widespread sense of frustration within the cancer research community. Leaf speaks the truth, which explains why this book has been widely welcomed.

Going over the accounts
A financial journalist by background, Leaf makes good use of numbers to illustrate his points.

Numbers like these:

691 – the number of times “cancer breakthrough” was mentioned in the media between January 1990 and November 2003
71 – the number of new cancer drug approvals over the same period
45 – the number of approvals for new drugs (rather than new uses for existing drugs)
12 – the number of those new drugs that could show they actually helped keep people alive

Or these:

65,000 – the number of papers published by 2013 on p53
24,000 – the number of papers published by 2013 on c-Myc
$100,000 – estimated cost per study
0 – the number of cancer therapies based on these targets

Or on the process of applying for an R01 grant, the bedrock of medical research funding in the US:

260 – the number of pages in the Application Guide
23 – the number of steps in the application procedure
1 year – the average duration of an application process
1 in 10 – the chance of success

Or these, on the chances of becoming a principal investigator before your 36th birthday:

1 in 20 – the figure for 2013
1 in 4 – the same figure back in 1980

What the figures reveal, argues Leaf, is a culture centred on generating data that can be published rather than generating knowledge that could lead to a cure.

Everyone who wants to see faster progress in curing cancer, and young scientists who don’t want to waste their most creative years, have an interest in reading this book.

Clifton Leaf is deputy managing editor at Fortune. He will be formally presented with the Best Cancer Reporter Lifetime Achievement Award by Franco Cavalli, chair of ESO’s scientific committee, at the International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano, June 2015.