Tag Archives: early detection

Closing the 40% survival gap in Gaza

 

shayma wahaidi cropped

Shaymaa Al Wahaidi is a pharmacist trained in public health who is about to return to Gaza to support efforts to improve diagnosis and care of breast cancer patients

In Gaza, only around 50% of women diagnosed with breast cancer will still be alive five years down the line, compared to almost 90% in countries like the UK and USA.

 

I’m a Palestinian pharmacist from Gaza, and I’m about to return there after completing a Public Health course in Oxford, with a view to becoming a public health researcher. My current interest is the lack of support for early diagnosis for women with breast cancer in Gaza. I used to work with breast cancer patients, and I’ve noticed that women in Gaza often present late for diagnosis and have many fears associated with the disease.

 

The poor rate of breast cancer survival partly reflects cultural attitudes about breast cancer. Some women, for instance, worry about being divorced if they were to be diagnosed with the breast cancer. As result, even if they suspect that they have breast cancer, they sometimes prefer to keep silent and die waiting.

 

But women can also be deterred from seeking a diagnosis because they know how hard it can be to get access to treatment. Once diagnosed with breast cancer, women face many challenges, and it has been suggested that their treatment in Gaza is below acceptable standards. A few years ago, the Ministry of Health had to appeal to international bodies after stocks of almost 15% of essential chemotherapy drugs ran out, and adherence to scheduled treatments for breast cancer was impossible due to the erratic supply of medicines.

 

This problem has not been resolved. Last December, breast cancer patients in Gaza organised a demonstration in protest that the medication they need is still not available, and even when it is available, it is unaffordable.

 

Part of the problem is poor use of meagre resources. There’s only one histopathological laboratory, and there are no facilities for radiotherapy. And yet there are currently four mammography units in Gaza, despite the evidence-based research that challenges whether women in general derive any benefit from mammographic screening. Most of the time hospitals cannot import the chemicals used for the mammography X-rays anyway. Considering Gaza’s disastrous economy – half the population lives on less than $3 per day – spending money on mammography facilities, which charge around $27 per appointment, is not justifiable.

 

It is my hope that we can start to improve the situation for women and for breast cancer patients in Gaza if we start to direct research attention to how we can improve our healthcare facilities, train up personnel in breast cancer investigation and treatment, and improve adherence to treatment guidelines.

 

We also need to conduct detailed investigations to understand more, for instance, about women’s experiences and perceptions regarding adherence to treatment, and about their quality of life and their experiences after mastectomy.

 

As long as health services in Gaza are unable to offer adequate treatments for breast cancer patients, Palestinian women will continue to die from a disease which in many countries is seeing increasingly high survival rates. In addition, until significant steps are taken in early diagnosis, women will continue to present at a late stage of the disease, when the chances of prolonging their lives are reduced.

 

I hope that when I return home in a few weeks’ time, I will be able to use what I’ve learned to start to make a real difference.

Breast cancer patients and survivors help other patients by sewing prosthetic breasts that are distributed free

Breast cancer patients and survivors help other patients by sewing prosthetic breasts that are distributed free

The multiple problems women with breast cancer face in Gaza have been captured in a moving animation, “Fatenah”, which follows the journey of one woman from her delayed diagnosis to the multiple delays, stress and humiliation involved in getting access to the right treatment 

Fatenah

 

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