Tag Archives: survivors

It’s not a war on cancer that we need, it’s a revolution

anna portrait  pic

Anna Wagstaff

The influential Economist magazine describes its mission as “to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress”.

So when it turned its attention to organising a conference on the “War on Cancer”, I registered for a press pass. I was familiar with most of the speakers, and I wasn’t expecting to hear anything I didn’t already know. But I thought The Economist might attract an interesting and diverse audience, and I was interested to hear how the discussion would go.

It did turn out to be interesting – but not in a good way. While the agenda was wide-ranging and the chair asked sensible questions to dig deeper into the issues, the audience was largely inanimate – except when the topic touched on new medical therapies.

When it came to the intricacies of the adaptive pathways approach to approving new drugs, the challenge of speeding progress through health technology assessment, the obstacles to trialling combinations of drugs in patients who stood to benefit most, the questions came thick and fast.

When the subject was how to provide care for escalating numbers of survivors, fix unacceptable variations in care quality, provide better access to different types of radiotherapy, or address missed prevention opportunities – silence.

Thinking about it, I should have expected this.

Yes, it was a well-balanced agenda, but the so-called war on cancer in reality lacks any such balance, and it is not surprising that this was reflected in the composition and interests of the audience.

Researching and developing new medical treatments remains the biggest hope for increasing cancer survival, and this effort deserves all the support it can get. But the extent to which this agenda dominates the ‘war’ strategy is out of all proportion to the contribution it is making to reducing death and suffering from cancer.

This point was made in different ways by many of the speakers.  Chris Wild, head of IARC, and Cary Adams, head of the UICC, talked about the central role of prevention, saying “We cannot treat our way out of cancer,” and “Only 3% of the cancer research budget goes towards prevention, and it’s wrong.”

Cai Grau, leader of ESTRO’s HERO project, talked about the role of radiotherapy, which accounts for around 40% of cancer cures, and has been shown to be a cost-effective treatment. He pointed out the benefit to patient outcomes that could be achieved by putting more effort into addressing the severe undercapacity in many European countries.

Francesco de Lorenzo, President of the European Cancer Patient Coalition, talked about the priority patients give to ending the treatment lottery. They want more attention paid to ensuring that wherever they are treated, they can trust their medical team to deliver high quality care.

Jane Maher, Macmillan’s Chief Medical Officer, spoke convincingly about what can and must to be done to ensure that growing numbers of cancer survivors get the support and care they need not just to survive, but to get their lives back on track and lead a fulfilling life.

What they were all saying was that we do in fact know how to make faster progress against cancer, we’re just not doing it. Sadly, this audience didn’t seem to see it as their problem. And this got me wondering about the war against cancer. Is the problem really one of “intelligence versus ignorance” as The Economist frames it, or is it that the people in the driving seat are so focused on their own agenda that the wider interests of the public, patients and survivors are being sidelined?

The problem may be that we are trying to fight a war when what we really need is a revolution.