“The purse is closed!” – this is no way to run a hospital

Rosa Giuliani, medical oncologist, S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy

Rosa Giuliani, medical oncologist, S. Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy


As a medical oncologist my primary interest is in helping patients to live longer and better. The best part of my job is the integration of clinical and molecular views: see the problem in the clinic, look for answers in the lab, bring back the solution to patients. I wish it could be as simple as that.

Research & development have a price, which is often difficult to understand. Why new drugs and devices cost that much, and not a penny less, is a complicated conundrum for many of us. The EU regulatory and reimbursement systems, the lack of a universal health policy through Europe and the profound economic crisis are regularly debated.

While I was at ECCO participating in debates on the need to promote equity and defeat disparities in access to precision medicine in Europe, hospital managers where I work notified the oncology department that the budget allocated to cancer drugs expenditure was over:no “expensive” drugs could be purchased until the budget for the new year will be discussed in January. The purse was closed. Meetings followed, some very unpleasant; poor use of resources by medical staff was implied, not even too subtly. Of course, this prompted self-examination: am I a good oncologist? Am I following guidelines? Am I spending money for my pleasure to give drugs?

After this last question, I realized that I was losing my mind and luckily, I returned to my senses. I respect rules, I need rules, I love rules. I appreciate fair rules. Budget negotiations at local hospitals are as obscure as the procedure of setting prices at EU or national level. A rule, which lacks of transparency, is not fair. The fact that the rules are set and dealt by people who are not prepared to manage the process, is terribly wrong. The overwhelming gap between cancer politics at EU Headquarters, where precision medicine is being promoted, and cancer politics at local level, where the only interest is that 2+2 should be equal to 3, because 4 is already too expensive, is frightening.

Money is an important part of the equation: resources are not infinite and their rational employment is of utmost importance. The process of drug development is not cost-effective, and many managers are not, because they have not been adequately prepared to deal with a different type of economy. Cancer medicine cannot be dealt as if providing water or electricity.

The global curriculum for being a good medical oncologist has dramatically changed in the past 10 years. Medical oncologists in 2015 cannot neglect molecular biology, health policies, precision medicine and so on. The same change should happen with managers who allocate resources for health politics, especially at hospital level. Being a good accountant does not suffice anymore, just as being exclusively a good clinician is not enough. Another level of knowledge and preparation is needed. And honestly, sometimes, a little bit of emotional intelligence would not do any harm.

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