We have breast cancer units – so why not prostate cancer units?

Simon Crompton

Simon Crompton

There are few certainties in prostate cancer: intense debate continues to surround the benefits and drawbacks of screening, the relative merits of surgery, brachytherapy and radiotherapy and surgery, the right times for active surveillance and radical therapies. But through all the dialogue, a plain fact is now being acknowledged that casts a light on all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and continuing support. The patient’s own preferences, personality and circumstances have a central bearing on what the “right” decisions actually are.

Thanks to the efforts of patient organisations such as Europa Donna, this principle has already received widespread recognition in the most common cancer in women, breast cancer. A new European Parliament policy in 2003 prompted the growth of specialist breast units based around patient-centred multidisciplinary care teams. This, it has become clear, is the best way to take account of a wide range of individual needs and preferences.

The most common cancer in men, prostate cancer, is not yet widely benefitting from such a re-alignment. But that may change.

ESO promotes the specialist model

The specialist unit model is particularly well suited to prostate cancer and its convoluted decision-making. Not only does it provide specialist care and support at every stage – whether it be active surveillance, surgery and radiotherapy side effects or palliative care. It can also help patients recognise emotional needs that might not otherwise be addressed – and studies show that men are less likely than women to recognise the need for help.

These are all points that have been made with some force by the European School of Oncology’s Prostate Cancer Programme, led by Riccardo Valdagni, Scientific Director of the Division of Radiotherapy 1 and the Prostate Cancer Programme at the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan. The programme developed the concept of prostate cancer units (PCUs), and in an influential article in the European Journal of Cancer in 2011 set out the concept and what was involved in terms of professional education and experience. The central principle is specialist care, multi professional care.

The idea is catching on. When I recently interviewed Per Anders Abrahamsson from the European Association of Urology, he said he supported PCUs, adding that non-prostate specialists had been treating the condition for too long. “We are definitely behind the concept of units. In many countries already, for example the UK, you now have to operate a certain number of cases a year and demonstrate follow-up and outcome to be allowed to carry out a procedure. I am convinced this is what will happen in all European countries.”

New paper sets the way forward

In August, the case for Europe-wide PCUs moves a step onwards with the publication of a new position paper from ESO in Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, setting out the core criteria for defining the units in European countries. The criteria have been compiled by the PCU Initiative in Europe Task Force, established by ESO in 2012 to set standards for quality comprehensive prostate cancer care and designating care pathways in PCUs.

As Riccardo Valdagni says in the paper, there is a general cultural shift towards multiprofessional working which should win a consensus among the uro-oncologic community. But the influence of those who stand to benefit most could be crucial.

“The efforts of patient advocacy groups in increasing patients’ awareness about the importance of being treated and followed up in top quality centers are key elements for the success of the initiative,” he writes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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